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Friday, May 14, 2010

After the Rain


There is so much to see here at the seaside after heavy rains. I always go down to observe those enormous waves, heavy with water after the previous day's deluge. This little guy is sitting here like a statue. Shall we try to guess his thoughts?

Maybe he is thinking of NATURE, the immense power of the storming waves. He can watch the seagulls diving down for all the "fast food" like "storm-crushed mussels". He can watch that brown mass in the water which is kelp that has been uprooted and will soon be thrown out on the pebbles to rot. He can count the waves and wait for every 7th one, which is always the big one!

He can also consider HISTORY! This exact spot claimed The British Peer in 1896. (Wikepedia made one mistake. It was not at Saldanha but at Kabeljoubank where it wrecked!) The ship's ballast consisted of small red and yellow Victorian facebricks. Nowadays, when somebody collects pebbles and shells they will find the completely rounded "brick pebbles" as a reminder of that large wreck. The boy may also think sad thoughts of family tragedy. I once met an older couple sitting here, who said that their son had an accident in a little boat here. This, unfortunately is something that can take place on the West Coast!

But, knowing boys, I think it is GEOGRAPHY on his mind, of leaving one day for places far away. Ask a local person what you will find over the water and they answer "England". The English arrived along these shores when they attacked the country in the beginning and again at the end of the nineteenth century, so maybe that planted the idea. (But if our boy travels as the crow flies he will reach not Britain, but Uruguay!)

After the rock painting, I remained in the mood for subjects of limited colour, so I will search for one of our local "wildlife", a Cape franklin, vole, mongoose or tortoise to paint next. The colours waiting on my palette are black, white, yellow ocre, Indian red and the one I can never do without: Prussian Blue.

17 comments:

  1. BEAUTIFUL waves Marie! I can still see the storm in them. I just love it when the sea gets all hyped up!

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  2. Gosh, I really love this painting. The gesture of the boy is perfect. I love his little white trunks with the folds. The sea is churning and I can smell the ocean air. Very nice! I also enjoy all of the information about your beautiful land.

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  3. Thank you Maree and Linda! I am glad you can feel what I felt when standing there!

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  4. I always enjoy your stories, of speculation and history that accompany your beautiful paintings. That young man's warm skin tones are wonderfully complemented by those cool blue waves.

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  5. I know what you mean about Prussian Blue, it's such a stunning colour. So rich yet somewhat luminous! Your paintings are lovely and you're so lucky to have such a beautiful country to inspire you everyday. Looking forward to seeing more from you. I love the rocks below.

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  6. Thank you, Sheila. Yes, this area has so many stories as it is our most vulnerable side! And there are complete books on wrecks of the Cape of Storms! Thank you for your color observations, I was not even aware of the contrast!

    Hi Caroline,all my works tend to have a matt bluish look, which is the result of using that particular colour! Welcome to my blog!

    Dankie Elizabeth, gaaf van jou om hier in te loer!

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  7. Ah Marie; this is a stunning painting. I love the blues in the rocks, making it seem as though the rocks are wet and still holding small pools of the sea. The skin tones on the young man are perfection and the whole composition reminds me of a photo of my youngest daughter sitting on the rocks and looking out over the water. Now I find myself wondering what she was thinking then!

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  8. Watch that prussian blue... It is as staining as thalo!!

    It's always interesting to try to imagine what others are thinking... There is a serenity to your painting... Makes all of us want to contemplate the waves, I think!!

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  9. What a fascinating post, Marie! And your palette is exactly right for this wonderfully evocative painting.

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  10. Oh Marie, my first thought was 'I hope he doesn't get washed off!' - those waves are gigantic! What a great story - it bring this beautiful painting into another dimension!

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  11. Hi Sherry, Thanks again for your lovely comments, I hope you kept that photo.

    Are you sure, Marian? I run a mile when I see thalo! But the local brand of Prussian Blue is a navy color similar to Payne's Gray but not as dull. Thanks for calling my painting serene, I had exactly that in mind!

    Liz, down below the little guy is a wide pebble beach where all the kelp is thrown out by the waves. So, no danger, really! I am glad you like my story.

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  12. Thank you, Charlene. I will be staying with those colors for a while now as it sets a certain mood!

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  13. Great thought provoking painting, Marie.
    Looks like he would like to go for a swim but the surf may be too rough.
    Interesting- the fishing village post & painting too. Nice work!

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  14. What an incredibly interesting story and historical account of this beach. We love to be near water and enjoy its bounty and beauty, but we are also respectful of its power. Even though we know it can overpower us, it can't quell our sense of adventure and wonderment. This painting represents this feeling so well. The waves really do seem powerful. Thanks for sharing your palette. Must go and dig out my Prussian Blue.

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  15. Thank you Jill, I know we share a similar environment, so I always enjoy your visit here!

    Catherine, you really understand what I experienced here (and the little guy too!)The sound of such high waves are overwhelming and at home we cannot even hear the TV when they roll in!

    I must say that I do not know whether your P.Blue and mine are the same! I use a locally manufactured paint called DALA Acrylics. I have used it for 15 years and love it, but do not use their white.

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  16. Hi Marie,

    Your text was as interesting as the painting. I love the painting but when you added your comments it made the boy and the waves come alive. Thanks for sharing. I'm also enjoying seeing all the beautiful artwork posted on FB. I love to share it on my blog always mentioning the artist of course.

    Anne-Marie

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  17. So kind of you Anne-Marie! I had no idea that you were showing my work!

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I love your comments, they make my day!