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Saturday, July 2, 2011

Kabeljou Bank






I have often painted here and told my readers of some of the happenings at Kabeljou Bank. This part of the coast is so beautiful but very inhospitable.

On 9 December 1896, The British Peer, commanded by Captain Jesse Jones hit the rocks while on her way from London to deliver tea, coffee, machinery, pianos and building materials to Cape Town. Even to this day, pieces of building materials wash ashore. Many lives were lost. At a salvaging operation in 1979 the bell was found. ( 33 degrees 30.40S, 18 degrees 18.17E )

Of course there are also lovely bits of history associated with Kabeljou Bank. This is the spot where Cape visitors came by horse cart for picnics in the flower season during the nineteen-twenties. They watched how the chinkeninchees were picked to export to London. And here, throughout the autumn and winter months hundreds of snoek are still hung out to dry.

My painting is a mixed media piece of black craft paint, acrylic and watercolour paints, oil pastels and oil thinning medium.

Source for The British Peer: Shipwrecks and Salvage in South Africa by Malcolm Turner.

15 comments:

  1. Oh, I meant you are the only South African amongst a few artists on my blogroll.
    Do you know Fan My Flames? She is a textile artist.

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  2. This is really great Marie, lovely rock work and interesting info! Sorry I haven't been commenting much lately, been so busy painting and have been neglecting the blogs I follow!

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  3. Marie, I have missed so many beautiful posts and delightful stories. Love this painting, and really like the fact that you used mixed mediums! Done very well!

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  4. OK Marie I just added you to blogs i follow! Now I won't miss out on your new posts!

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  5. Your painting has great depth, you can see forever into the distance.

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  6. What an interesting story about the Peer. I am amazed that pieces of the wreck are still boiling to shore! This is a beautiful painting, Marie, so well done. I love it! Is that a wee bit of tide pool below that rock? How delightful!

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  7. Thank you, Diane! I will find that artist's blog!

    Thank you, Maree! No problem, I have neglected blogging too. I gardened and painted windows - no way to run a blog!

    Thank you for your kind comments and for giving me a link, Cissy!

    Thank you, Liana, the view goes up right to Table Mountain!

    Thank you Sherry,I own a few pieces of brick from the wreck! What you noticed is not a pool but the start of some spring vegetation. I have added a new link on this post that will take you to a springtime painting of Kabeljou Bank.

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  8. a great rendition of these rocks, Marie! The flying birds add greatly to the composition.

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  9. Such a special looking area, Marie. You've captured it's essence - and, your birds truly look at though they are in flight!

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  10. Thank you, Dean! I have displayed this painting in my studio, and I must say, everytime I pass, I like it too!

    Thank you, Linny. It is truly a spot steeped in history, and I am thankful that I can reach it in less than 10 minutes.

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  11. The flying birds and the rock work made me feel the aura of this lovely place,,an interesting read on the history too!

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  12. My favorite part of your painting is all of those wonderful birds, Marie!!!

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  13. Padmaja, I am happy that you think so! I wanted the birds to be a mass of wings and not just individual birds!

    I wanted to use the same words for you, Marian! You were so correct in spotting the importance of the birds in this painting!

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  14. What a beautiful painting of a place that holds so much history. I know I have comment this to you before, but I think that you paints blues (and all of their varying shades) so wonderfully. I love the movement of the birds - quite a delightful painting!

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  15. Claire, Thank you for this thoughtful comment. I have recently looked over a lot of my paintings, and surely the blue hues dominate. I am fussy with blue and seldom use Ultramarine blue. My favorite is Prussian Blue, followed by Cobalt Blue.

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