Google+ Followers

Pages

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Buoy! Oh Buoy!


Saldanha lies on the West Coast Peninsula on what is claimed to be the largest natural bay in Africa. The steelworks, the fishing industry and water sport enthusiasts benefit from this natural deep harbour. Saldanha, of course played a prominent role in history.

During the rule of Napoleon the English feared that the French would befriend the Dutch, and get hold of Table Bay and then own the rich route to the East. Therefore the British Army anchored here at Saldanha and soldiers were dispatched overland to take the Cape. There was a lot of hardship for the British soldiers who had to walk through the thick fynbos wearing down their shoes. Still, the burghers and farmers under Genl Janssens were not fighters and in 1806 England won the Battle of Blouberg and became rulers of the Cape once more! (They had annexed it before, then gave it back to the Dutch)

Every corner of this bay is beautiful and a worthy subject for a painting. Here I have found a colourful bunch of ropes and buoys belonging to a fishing vessel. With the sun shining, it makes a perfect "marine still life"!

11 comments:

  1. Oh Marie!! The tangled nest of ropes is a perfect contrast to the smooth buoys and and background. This is lovely! You did a lot of work rending all that rope but it paid off big time.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Marie, this is just spectacular! I love it! It is playful and beautiful. Love how you accomplished the feeling of network set against the buoys.

    ReplyDelete
  3. What a wonderful image to focus in on, Marie. I love your artist's eye and love hearing facts about the area in which you live!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow Marie - that rope is totally amazing! And I can just see all those soldiers in their bright red gear traipsing down what is now the West Coast Road! Really lovely post.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I am going to say the same thing as the rest about that robe. Omg....girlfriend!! That must of taken you forever...lol! The painting is really gorgeous! Thank you for the post. I've learned something new this morning.

    ReplyDelete
  6. These were such friendly comments! Thank you Sheila, Linda, Sherry, Liz and Manon!

    I must come clean about the rope: it was done very fast after the whole painting was finished. If there was a magazine that was interested, I would be willing to write "the bluffer's guide to painting rope."It asked for no preliminary drawing, and three pools of different colours.

    The Battle of Blouberg is a very interesting story! Blouberg is such a low unobtrusive hill, how could it play such a heavy role in history?

    ReplyDelete
  7. I always love coming to your blog - such a treat to not only see a beautiful painting but also to be able to learn a little about where it is, why you paint it and a little history thrown in as well!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Marie...just love reading and learning about your beautiful country. Thanks for your latest comment on yesterdays posting...really appreciate your kind words and compliments. Wishing you continued happy painting!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Marie, I am learning so much from your blog. I love this composition with the ropes. Well done.

    ReplyDelete
  10. hmmm, not sure I get the Network Blog thingy! I commented, and it posted to my profile on Facebook! Well, I said that I really enjoyed the painting, and this History lesson, Marie! The pile of rope is great, amazing that it was done so quickly!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi there Marie!
    I've also added this little gem to me collection!

    ReplyDelete

I love your comments, they make my day!